Ink Review #846: KWZ Sheen Machine

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For the rest of this week we are going to tackle some inks I picked up at the San Francisco Pen Show last month, starting with KWZ Sheen Machine. I picked up a bottle at the Vanness Pen table. Super sheening inks still seem to be all the rage, so this is KWZ’s newest ink.

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The color:

Sheen Machine is a dark blue with a ton of pink sheen.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink is mostly sheen with a little bit of blue mixed in.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 30 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: High

Bleeding: Medium

Other properties: low shading, monster sheen, and no shimmer. There is a little bit of shading, there could be a lot more but if so it’s hidden under all that sheen. The sheen is visible in all nib sizes on Tomoe River paper and Leuchtturm, as well as the larger nib sizes on Rhodia.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Sheen Machine is similar to Organics Studio Nitrogen, Krishna Moonview and Diamine Maureen. Click here to see the KWZ inks together, and click here to see the blue inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Pilot Metropolitan Retro Pop Purple with a fine nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow, a bit sticky though. Even in this small fine nib the writing is mostly sheen, it’s hard to even see the blue under it.

Overall, it is very similar to Organics Studio Nitrogen, except that the flow is a little bit better. You can smear it easily if you aren’t careful, even after it’s been dry for a few days. Monster sheening inks aren’t my favorite since they can smear after drying, but they are fun to play with.

Disclaimer: I purchased this ink myself, and all photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #845: Vinta Azure Maharlika 7107

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We’ve made it to the last Vinta Ink sample I have, Vinta Azure Maharlika 7107 from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “Maharlika means "nobility" in Tagalog. These men and women were the leaders of the Filipino communities before the Spaniards arrived in the 16th century to colonize the Philippines. The beautiful azure color of this ink with pink accents evokes the image of the dusk in the Philippines as the sun sets over its 7107 islands.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Maharlika is a medium-dark blue with lots of pink sheen.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some pink sheen, but there wasn’t quite as much sheen as I expected.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib.

Other properties: low shading, high sheen, and no shimmer. There was sheen in every nib size on Leuchtturm and Tomoe River paper, but I couldn’t get it to sheen on Rhodia, so it falls a bit short of the “monster sheener” mark.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Maharlika seems to fit in-between two inks, a bit darker than Blackstone Barrier Reef Blue, but not quite as dark as Organics Studio Nitrogen. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the blue inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a TWSBI Eco Transparent Blue with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, it has a high pink sheen, not as much as the monster sheening inks, but does suffer some of the same issues they do (although not as badly), a few hard starts, slightly sticky flow, and can be smeared days after drying. I wrote the writing sample shown above over a week ago but I can still easily smear it if I run my hand across the page. I enjoy playing with high sheening inks, but I don’t reach for them often due to the smearing. I’ve used my entire sample of the ink, but I don’t need a full bottle of it.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #844: Vinta Pink Sands Santa Cruz 1983

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We’ve almost made it through the Vinta samples I have-today’s is Vinta Pink Sands Santa Cruz 1983. According to Vinta’s website, “Pink sands can be found in the Great Santa Cruz beach as well as in the province of Northern Samar. The pink comes from pulverized red corals which blends with the white sand. This gorgeous shimmering ink takes the contrast a little further by using a base of yellow and pink gold shimmer to produce an image of a sun drenched beach at dusk.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Santa Cruz is a bright medium orange with gold shimmer.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper there is lots of gold shimmer.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: None

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and gold shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Santa Cruz is similar to Diamine Citrus Ice except that Citrus Ice has silver shimmer not gold. Sailor Apricot is a close non-shimmer orange. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the orange inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Kaweco Sport Orange with a double broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had a slightly dry flow.

Overall, It’s pretty well behaved, a fun color and no problems with clogging. Diamine Citrus Ice is a good alternative if you prefer silver shimmer instead of gold.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #843: Vinta Teal Andrada 1898

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Let’s take a look at Vinta Teal Andrada 1898 from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “In 1898, the Philippine Navy was founded. The first headquarters is in Andrada, Manila named after the commanding officer of the navy, Jose Andrada. This beautiful sheening teal color with specks of red highlights the diverse colors of the Philippine waters.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

I don’t know why this ink is called Teal Andrada because it’s a dark forest green with dark red sheen, not teal.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink almost looks navy blue with red sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Medium-there was quite a bit of bleeding on Leuchtturm.

Other properties: low shading, medium sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Andrada is darker than Diamine November Rain. The sheen is the same color, but Andrada has less sheen than November Rain. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Conklin Durograph Forest Green with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, this ink is well behaved except on Leuchtturm paper. I didn’t have any issues with the sheen smearing after it dried (except on the Col-o-ring). The sheen is visible in all nib sizes on Tomoe River paper, but not on any other papers.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #842: Vinta Emerald Carlos 1960

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We are continuing on with Vinta’s Series 1 inks this week, so today’s ink is Emerald Carlos 1960. According to Vinta’s website, “This ink is named after former Filipino president Carlos P. Garcia who refused to cooperate with the Japanese forces during WWII. Garcia is also from Bohol known for their majestic and lush chocolate hills.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Carlos is a medium-dark green with a slight yellow/olive tone.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some interesting shading. The ink turns almost black where it pooled, but doesn’t sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Carlos is similar to Monteverde Olivine, but it has a little less yellow in it. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Lamy Al-star Purple with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, I enjoyed this ink. It had an average flow, some decent shading, and is a nice color for fall and winter.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #841: Vinta Sea Kelp Leyte 1944

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Today’s ink is Vinta Sea Kelp Leyte 1944, from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “The Battle of the Leyte Gulf is where the Japanese were ultimately defeated at the end of WWII. Leyte is also one of the biggest producers of Kelp. This gentle green ink evokes the color of kelp as it floats in the bright clear seawaters of Leyte.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Leyte is a medium army green.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some interesting shading.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Leyte seems like a darker version of Rohrer and Klingner Alt-Goldgrun. Leyte has a bit more yellow in it than Taccia Uguisu Olive Green but less yellow than Noodler’s Army. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Kaweco Sport Sunrise with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, I really enjoy the color of this ink. I love R&K Alt-Goldgrun, and this ink feels similar to that. It performed well for the most part, I just wouldn’t use it in flex nibs.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #840: Vinta Sikatuna Sandugo 1565

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This week it’s time to tackle some of the Vinta Series 1 inks, starting with Vinta Sikatuna Sandugo 1565. According to Vinta’s website, “In 1565, Datu Sikatuna and the Spanish Miguel López de Legazpi made a blood compact, or Sandugo, to seal their friend­ship with trust. This beautiful dark red ink sheens with green to symbolize both friendship and the lush green landscape of Bohol where the Sandugo was held.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

As soon as I swabbed this ink it quickly reminded me of J Herbin Rouge Hematite. It feels like a similar red with green sheen, so we will compare the two below.

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The color:

Sandugo is a medium red with lots of green sheen.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper it’s easy to see the bright green sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 30 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib.

Other properties: low shading, high sheen, and no shimmer. There could be some more shading under there, but if so it’s hidden under all the green sheen. It’s almost a monster sheener, just a little bit short of the mark.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Sandugo is very similar to Rouge Hematite, the main difference is that Sandugo doesn’t have any shimmer. Other than that they are very close. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the red inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a TWSBI Eco Coral with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had a wet, slightly sticky flow (this sticky quality is common in heavy sheening inks).

Overall, it’s a close match for J Herbin Rouge Hematite, so if you are looking for a non-shimmer version of that ink, this is the one for you. It does have the slightly sticky feeling flow that a lot of heavy sheening inks do. It doesn’t smear as much as the Organics Studio sheening inks, but does smear more than the Diamine sheening inks. This ink is very hard to clean out in pens. It took three rinses as well as two passes in the ultrasonic cleaner before my pens were free of red. While sheening inks are fun, I’m not a fan of the ones you can easily smear, so I would say my feelings are neutral on this ink-I don’t love it due to the smearing, but I don’t hate it either.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Endless Recorder Notebook

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I go through a lot of notebooks each year, a rather ridiculous amount, so I get excited to try out new notebooks. Today’s daily carry notebook is the Endless Recorder Notebook. I have the A5 with the Endless Space black cover. I brought this notebook with me to the San Francisco Pen show, and the leatherette cover (8.3 x 5.5 inches) has held up beautifully. In the US, this notebook is available for sale at Endless Works, Pen Chalet, Goulet Pens and more. Thanks to Endless Works for sending the notebook over for review.

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Paper

This notebook contains 192 pages of 68gsm dot grid Tomoe River paper. This paper does a great job with fountain pens, no feathering or bleeding. It’s my favorite paper.

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This paper handles most mediums well, but it does struggle a bit with pencils. I love it for fountain pens.

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I love that this notebook contains a table of contents and can lay flat. This notebook also has a ribbon bookmark, a back cover pocket, and an elastic closure. Included with the notebook was a cloth drawstring protective bag, a silver bookmark engraved with my name and a packet of guide sheets.

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I like that the pages are numbered, but if you look at the numbers you can see one of my concerns with this notebook. The cut on the pages are not even. There is less space on the bottom margin on page 9 than on page 13. This inconsistent cutting means that you can sometimes see the next page’s dot grid occasionally ghosting through on the current page.

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The last 30 pages of the notebook are perforated. At the bottom of the photo you can see the inconsistent cutting again-you shouldn’t be able to see the guide lines.

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Binding

The binding is stitch and glue bound. There are a few spots in the notebook where the glue has seeped into the binding and partially sealed a few pages together. I had to separate a few pages near the binding which lead to some tearing.

Overall, I like the cover and love the paper. I do have some concerns about the inconsistent cutting and the glue in the binding, which I hope they can work out over time since they are a relatively young company. This notebook has held up to daily use for a few weeks and the cover still looks brand new.

Disclaimer: All photos and opinions are my own. This product was provided by Endless Works for the purpose of this review. This post does not contain affiliate links and is not sponsored in any way.

Fall September Inks

If you were to look at my life, you might think I hate color. All of my furniture is brown, beige or white. 99% of my clothes are neutral and most of the time I even choose neutral-colored notebooks whenever possible, but when it comes to ink and pens I want all the colors of the rainbow. I’m a bit odd in that I like to switch up my colors with the seasons-pastels and light colors in the spring, bright happy colors in the summer, jewel tones and deeper colors in the fall and dark colors and icy blues in the winter. So while I love all the colors, I try to stick to a few carefully chosen colors that coordinate well with each other. Lately I’ve been using 4 colors per week-a great neutral, usually black or blue-black, and three coordinating colors. This lets me have a few options to play with while still having a great basic in there too. This month I decided to plan out my colors in advance. I picked up this Col-o-ring Oversize at the San Francisco Pen Show and thought it would be great for keeping my color palettes.

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This week I’ve been holding onto the very last of summer here, sticking to some brighter inks.

  • Sailor Sei-boku

  • Monteverde Garnet

  • Montblanc Lucky Orange

  • Diamine Aurora Borealis

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  • Sailor Kiwa-guro

  • Monteverde Pumpkin Cake

  • Monteverde Cherry Danish

  • KWZ Chicago Blue

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  • Sailor Black

  • Robert Oster Australian Shiraz

  • Monteverde Olivine

  • Robert Oster Midnight Sapphire

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  • Robert Oster Thunderstorm

  • Sailor Jentle Yama-dori

  • Robert Oster Berry d’Arche

  • Robert Oster Caffe Crema

How many pens do you use each week?

Ink Review of Colorverse Martian & Life on Mars

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It’s time to take a look at the last two inks from the August Ink Flight box, (the box is still available-you can find it here) Colorverse Martian and Life on Mars. This ink comes in a boxed set with a 65ml bottle of Martian and a 15ml bottle of Life on Mars.

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The color:

Martian is an interesting burnt orange color, Life on Mars is somewhere between grey and teal. When I compared it to both grey and teal inks, I decided it leans a bit more toward the grey side.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink has some pretty shading.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Medium-both inks feathered in all nib sizes on Leuchtturm and the larger nib sizes on Rhodia.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Medium-both inks bled in all nib sizes on Leuchtturm and the larger nib sizes on Rhodia.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in the all nib sizes and had a lots of bleeding in the flex nib too.

Comparison Swabs:

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Martian is similar to KWZ Butterscotch. Life on Mars is a bit more unique-I didn’t have any good matches for it, neither grey nor teal inks came close. Click here to see the Colorverse inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a TWSBI Eco Transparent Orange with a medium nib and an Edison Beaumont Unicorn with a fine nib on Tomoe River paper.

Overall, I find the colors really interesting, but the performance just isn’t there for me. It performs well on Tomoe River paper, but 98% of inks do. There’s way too much feathering and bleeding on most papers to justify the high price of the ink. KWZ Butterscotch is a better-behaved alternative for Martian (which stinks because that was a limited edition show ink), but I don’t have a good alternative for Life on Mars.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Ink Journal for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.