Ink Review #843: Vinta Teal Andrada 1898

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Let’s take a look at Vinta Teal Andrada 1898 from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “In 1898, the Philippine Navy was founded. The first headquarters is in Andrada, Manila named after the commanding officer of the navy, Jose Andrada. This beautiful sheening teal color with specks of red highlights the diverse colors of the Philippine waters.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

I don’t know why this ink is called Teal Andrada because it’s a dark forest green with dark red sheen, not teal.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink almost looks navy blue with red sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Medium-there was quite a bit of bleeding on Leuchtturm.

Other properties: low shading, medium sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Andrada is darker than Diamine November Rain. The sheen is the same color, but Andrada has less sheen than November Rain. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Conklin Durograph Forest Green with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, this ink is well behaved except on Leuchtturm paper. I didn’t have any issues with the sheen smearing after it dried (except on the Col-o-ring). The sheen is visible in all nib sizes on Tomoe River paper, but not on any other papers.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #842: Vinta Emerald Carlos 1960

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We are continuing on with Vinta’s Series 1 inks this week, so today’s ink is Emerald Carlos 1960. According to Vinta’s website, “This ink is named after former Filipino president Carlos P. Garcia who refused to cooperate with the Japanese forces during WWII. Garcia is also from Bohol known for their majestic and lush chocolate hills.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Carlos is a medium-dark green with a slight yellow/olive tone.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some interesting shading. The ink turns almost black where it pooled, but doesn’t sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Carlos is similar to Monteverde Olivine, but it has a little less yellow in it. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Lamy Al-star Purple with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, I enjoyed this ink. It had an average flow, some decent shading, and is a nice color for fall and winter.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #841: Vinta Sea Kelp Leyte 1944

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Today’s ink is Vinta Sea Kelp Leyte 1944, from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “The Battle of the Leyte Gulf is where the Japanese were ultimately defeated at the end of WWII. Leyte is also one of the biggest producers of Kelp. This gentle green ink evokes the color of kelp as it floats in the bright clear seawaters of Leyte.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Leyte is a medium army green.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some interesting shading.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Leyte seems like a darker version of Rohrer and Klingner Alt-Goldgrun. Leyte has a bit more yellow in it than Taccia Uguisu Olive Green but less yellow than Noodler’s Army. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Kaweco Sport Sunrise with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, I really enjoy the color of this ink. I love R&K Alt-Goldgrun, and this ink feels similar to that. It performed well for the most part, I just wouldn’t use it in flex nibs.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #833: Colorverse Arabella

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The Ink Flight Box is a monthly ink sample subscription by Ink Journal, and they were very kind to send me this month’s subscription. August’s box includes 7 Colorverse inks (the box is still available-you can find it here). The first ink I want to take a look at is Colorverse #51 Arabella from Season 4. According to the card included with the inks, Arabella is a “Bright, ‘DOS prompt’ green named after a space-bound spider. Surface Tension: 76.0 / PH: 7.6”. Arabella comes in a box set with a 65ml bottle of Arabella and a smaller 15ml bottle of Anita.

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The color:

Arabella is a medium vivid green.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink has some nice shading and just a tiny hint of pink sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Rhodia and Leuchtturm.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib.

Other properties: low shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in the larger nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding in the flex nib too.

Comparison Swabs:

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In writing Arabella is pretty similar to Pilot Iroshizuku Fukurokuju from the anniversary set. Click here to see the Colorverse inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a TWSBI Eco Transparent Green with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, it’s a nice ink. I like the little bit of shading and the color but I don’t love that it feathers and bleeds in the flex nib on some papers. I do love the Ink Flight Box-it’s a nice way to try out some new inks each month. Check back later this week to see the other inks from the August box.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Ink Journal for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #823: Vinta Sirena

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Recently Vanness Pens started carrying Vinta inks, which I’ve never tried before. They sent me some samples to try out, and the first one I tried is Vinta Mermaid Green Sirena 1952. I’ve shortened the name to simply Sirena for this review. According to Vinta’s website, “Sirena is an homage to Mars Ravelo's famous Filipino comics Dyesebel about a mermaid. It is one of the most popular local comics that was serialized in 1952. This beautiful mint green has undertones of grey and pink.”

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The color:

Sirena is an unsaturated green, almost a pale cool tone green. I can imagine a mermaid this color, so the name is appropriate.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some of the pink/grey/brown undertones.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: None

Other properties: medium-high shading, no sheen, and no shimmer. I love that the shading sometimes shifts colors in the same letter-green at the top of the letter and pinkish-brown at the bottom.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Sirena shows off a lot of the brownish-pink undertone on the Col-o-ring paper. It looks very different from Sailor Ink Studio 162 which is more of a mint green. Papier Plume Streetcar Green is darker than Sirena. (L’Artisan Pastellier Olive has changed a lot over time. It used to be a lot more green and now it’s turned to a cool-tone brown. I think I need to update my review of it.) Click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Pilot Vanishing Point Galaxy with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had a slightly dry flow. There is some nice shading, but because the ink is so light it’s hard to see.

Overall, I love that the color shifts between green, pink, brown and grey. It is very pale though, so I would stick to broad and flex nibs to make it readable. Even then it can still be rather pale. I enjoy pastel inks and love broader nibs, so I think I could make it work for me, but I don’t love this one as much as I thought I would.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.