Ink Review #863: Vinta Bronze Yellow La Paz

Ink Review #863: Vinta Bronze Yellow La Paz

Vinta Bronze Yellow La Paz is a dark mustard yellow. According to Vinta’s website, “The only desert in the Philippines is located in La Paz, Ilocos Norte. The former Filipino dictator is also born in Ilocos Norte. Ironically, yellow is also the color that symbolized his eventual removal from office. The EDSA Revolution of 1986 is also known as the "Yellow Revolution." This color does not only evoke a fight for freedom and justice but also of the many diverse landscapes that can be found throughout the Philippines.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending the ink over for review.

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Ink Review #845: Vinta Azure Maharlika 7107

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We’ve made it to the last Vinta Ink sample I have, Vinta Azure Maharlika 7107 from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “Maharlika means "nobility" in Tagalog. These men and women were the leaders of the Filipino communities before the Spaniards arrived in the 16th century to colonize the Philippines. The beautiful azure color of this ink with pink accents evokes the image of the dusk in the Philippines as the sun sets over its 7107 islands.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Maharlika is a medium-dark blue with lots of pink sheen.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some pink sheen, but there wasn’t quite as much sheen as I expected.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib.

Other properties: low shading, high sheen, and no shimmer. There was sheen in every nib size on Leuchtturm and Tomoe River paper, but I couldn’t get it to sheen on Rhodia, so it falls a bit short of the “monster sheener” mark.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Maharlika seems to fit in-between two inks, a bit darker than Blackstone Barrier Reef Blue, but not quite as dark as Organics Studio Nitrogen. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the blue inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a TWSBI Eco Transparent Blue with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, it has a high pink sheen, not as much as the monster sheening inks, but does suffer some of the same issues they do (although not as badly), a few hard starts, slightly sticky flow, and can be smeared days after drying. I wrote the writing sample shown above over a week ago but I can still easily smear it if I run my hand across the page. I enjoy playing with high sheening inks, but I don’t reach for them often due to the smearing. I’ve used my entire sample of the ink, but I don’t need a full bottle of it.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #844: Vinta Pink Sands Santa Cruz 1983

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We’ve almost made it through the Vinta samples I have-today’s is Vinta Pink Sands Santa Cruz 1983. According to Vinta’s website, “Pink sands can be found in the Great Santa Cruz beach as well as in the province of Northern Samar. The pink comes from pulverized red corals which blends with the white sand. This gorgeous shimmering ink takes the contrast a little further by using a base of yellow and pink gold shimmer to produce an image of a sun drenched beach at dusk.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Santa Cruz is a bright medium orange with gold shimmer.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper there is lots of gold shimmer.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: None

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and gold shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Santa Cruz is similar to Diamine Citrus Ice except that Citrus Ice has silver shimmer not gold. Sailor Apricot is a close non-shimmer orange. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the orange inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Kaweco Sport Orange with a double broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had a slightly dry flow.

Overall, It’s pretty well behaved, a fun color and no problems with clogging. Diamine Citrus Ice is a good alternative if you prefer silver shimmer instead of gold.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #843: Vinta Teal Andrada 1898

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Let’s take a look at Vinta Teal Andrada 1898 from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “In 1898, the Philippine Navy was founded. The first headquarters is in Andrada, Manila named after the commanding officer of the navy, Jose Andrada. This beautiful sheening teal color with specks of red highlights the diverse colors of the Philippine waters.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

I don’t know why this ink is called Teal Andrada because it’s a dark forest green with dark red sheen, not teal.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink almost looks navy blue with red sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Medium-there was quite a bit of bleeding on Leuchtturm.

Other properties: low shading, medium sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Andrada is darker than Diamine November Rain. The sheen is the same color, but Andrada has less sheen than November Rain. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Conklin Durograph Forest Green with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, this ink is well behaved except on Leuchtturm paper. I didn’t have any issues with the sheen smearing after it dried (except on the Col-o-ring). The sheen is visible in all nib sizes on Tomoe River paper, but not on any other papers.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #842: Vinta Emerald Carlos 1960

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We are continuing on with Vinta’s Series 1 inks this week, so today’s ink is Emerald Carlos 1960. According to Vinta’s website, “This ink is named after former Filipino president Carlos P. Garcia who refused to cooperate with the Japanese forces during WWII. Garcia is also from Bohol known for their majestic and lush chocolate hills.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Carlos is a medium-dark green with a slight yellow/olive tone.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some interesting shading. The ink turns almost black where it pooled, but doesn’t sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Carlos is similar to Monteverde Olivine, but it has a little less yellow in it. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Lamy Al-star Purple with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, I enjoyed this ink. It had an average flow, some decent shading, and is a nice color for fall and winter.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #841: Vinta Sea Kelp Leyte 1944

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Today’s ink is Vinta Sea Kelp Leyte 1944, from Vinta’s Series 1. According to Vinta’s website, “The Battle of the Leyte Gulf is where the Japanese were ultimately defeated at the end of WWII. Leyte is also one of the biggest producers of Kelp. This gentle green ink evokes the color of kelp as it floats in the bright clear seawaters of Leyte.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Leyte is a medium army green.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some interesting shading.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib on Leuchtturm and Rhodia.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Leyte seems like a darker version of Rohrer and Klingner Alt-Goldgrun. Leyte has a bit more yellow in it than Taccia Uguisu Olive Green but less yellow than Noodler’s Army. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Kaweco Sport Sunrise with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, I really enjoy the color of this ink. I love R&K Alt-Goldgrun, and this ink feels similar to that. It performed well for the most part, I just wouldn’t use it in flex nibs.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #840: Vinta Sikatuna Sandugo 1565

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This week it’s time to tackle some of the Vinta Series 1 inks, starting with Vinta Sikatuna Sandugo 1565. According to Vinta’s website, “In 1565, Datu Sikatuna and the Spanish Miguel López de Legazpi made a blood compact, or Sandugo, to seal their friend­ship with trust. This beautiful dark red ink sheens with green to symbolize both friendship and the lush green landscape of Bohol where the Sandugo was held.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

As soon as I swabbed this ink it quickly reminded me of J Herbin Rouge Hematite. It feels like a similar red with green sheen, so we will compare the two below.

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The color:

Sandugo is a medium red with lots of green sheen.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper it’s easy to see the bright green sheen.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 30 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib.

Other properties: low shading, high sheen, and no shimmer. There could be some more shading under there, but if so it’s hidden under all the green sheen. It’s almost a monster sheener, just a little bit short of the mark.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Sandugo is very similar to Rouge Hematite, the main difference is that Sandugo doesn’t have any shimmer. Other than that they are very close. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the red inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a TWSBI Eco Coral with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had a wet, slightly sticky flow (this sticky quality is common in heavy sheening inks).

Overall, it’s a close match for J Herbin Rouge Hematite, so if you are looking for a non-shimmer version of that ink, this is the one for you. It does have the slightly sticky feeling flow that a lot of heavy sheening inks do. It doesn’t smear as much as the Organics Studio sheening inks, but does smear more than the Diamine sheening inks. This ink is very hard to clean out in pens. It took three rinses as well as two passes in the ultrasonic cleaner before my pens were free of red. While sheening inks are fun, I’m not a fan of the ones you can easily smear, so I would say my feelings are neutral on this ink-I don’t love it due to the smearing, but I don’t hate it either.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #832: Vinta Cosmic Blue Kosmos 1955

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Today’s ink is Vinta Cosmic Blue Kosmos 1955. According to Vinta’s website, “In 1865 the Jesuit Padre Faura started the Observatario Meterorologico de Manila to study Philippine and predict the passing of typhoons. This beautiful shimmering ink evokes the image of stars glimmering amidst the backdrop of the Philippine sky.” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Kosmos is a pretty medium blue with pink sheen and copper shimmer.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink looks so pretty-all sheen and shimmer.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib.

Other properties: low shading, medium sheen, and copper shimmer. There might be some more shading in there, but if there is its hidden underneath all the shimmer and sheen.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in the larger nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding in the flex nib too.

Comparison Swabs:

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Kosmos is very similar to De Atramentis Cyan Blue Copper. I do prefer Kosmos over the Cyan Blue simply because it’s slightly better behaved. Robert Oster Blue Water Ice is also similar, but without the shimmer. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the blue inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Bonecrusher Studios pen with a Regalia Writing Labs Crossflex nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink did clog the pen often, and I had to prime the feed a few times to make it flow well again.

Overall, I did have issues with clogging in a few different pens, and it was very hard to clean out when I was finished with it. I have a love/hate relationship with shimmer inks. In some pens they look so pretty but they do take some extra work. It is better behaved than some shimmer inks, but not as well behaved as others.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #831: Vinta Pastel Blue Julio 1991

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My middle child is obsessed with unicorns. She’s six and wears unicorns every day in some form from her shirt all the way down to her shoes. If any one ink could look like a unicorn, Vinta Pastel Blue Julio 1991 does. If she could paint herself with this ink she probably would. It’s a pale blue with a strong baby pink tone and silver shimmer. According to Vinta’s website, “Julio and Julia, was a popular show about two magical twins. It went on air in 1991. It was actually created by a French writer Jean Chalopin and the original title was Les Jumeaux du Bout du Monde or ‘Twins of Destiny.’” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Pastel Blue Julio is a pale baby blue with a strong pink undertone/shading and silver shimmer.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off the pink undertone and the silver shimmer.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: Low-there was some feathering in the flex nib on Rhodia and Leuchtturm

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: Low-there was some bleeding in the flex nib.

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and silver shimmer. There is a bit of shading in the blue but it’s so pale you have to be really looking for it to see it, and in the flex nib sometimes you can see the shift between the blue and pink tones.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in the larger nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding in the flex nib too.

Comparison Swabs:

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Julio is lighter than Montblanc Miles Davis (which I didn’t think was possible). I don’t have any blue shimmer inks this color, the closest I have (which isn’t close at all) is J Herbin Kyanite du Nepal. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the blue inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Bonecrusher Studios pen with a Regalia Writing Labs Crossflex nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had a dry flow. The color is really interesting-you can see the pink come out in a lot of the letters as well as lots of silver shimmer, but even in the flex nib the color is very pale.

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Overall, I loved playing with this ink, but I wouldn’t use it in anything smaller than a flex nib. It would be a good art ink.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #830: Pastel Pink Julia 1991

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I’ve finally done it-I’ve found an ink the color of cotton candy. Vinta Pastel Pink Julia 1991 is baby pink, the exact color of cotton candy. Since it is a very pale pink with gold shimmer it also looks like a baby shower exploded in the bottle. According to Vinta’s website, “Julio and Julia, was a popular show about two magical twins. It went on air in 1991. It was actually created by a French writer Jean Chalopin and the original title was Les Jumeaux du Bout du Monde or ‘Twins of Destiny.’” Thanks to Vanness Pens for sending a sample over for review.

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The color:

Julia looks just a bit weird when wet, a bit blue and cool-toned but then dries to this warm-tone baby pink. It has gold shimmer and just a hint of blue undertone that shows up in large swabs.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper you can see that hint of blue undertone around the edges.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 20 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Low

Bleeding: None

Other properties: no shading, no sheen, and gold shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink did better than I expected-almost no feathering, and most of the bleeding was confined to the flex nib.

Comparison Swabs:

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The closest shimmer ink to Julia is Robert Oster Rose Gilt Tynte. For non-shimmer, Julia seems to be a lighter version of Sailor Jentle Peche (I didn’t think was possible to get lighter than Peche but here we are…), but Peche has a yellow undertone not Julia’s blue. Click here to see the Vinta inks together, and click here to see the pink inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Lamy Safari Pastel Pink with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper to run with the sunrise theme. The ink had a very dry flow and clogged twice just while writing this page.

Overall, it’s sooo pale. Performance-wise it’s very dry and had problems with clogging. I liked it best in the flex nib where it was the most readable, but it did clog rather often-about every paragraph or two. It would be good as a highlighter or art ink. If you need an ink the color of cotton candy or for baby shower art-this is the ink for you.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.