Ink Review #823: Vinta Sirena

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Recently Vanness Pens started carrying Vinta inks, which I’ve never tried before. They sent me some samples to try out, and the first one I tried is Vinta Mermaid Green Sirena 1952. I’ve shortened the name to simply Sirena for this review. According to Vinta’s website, “Sirena is an homage to Mars Ravelo's famous Filipino comics Dyesebel about a mermaid. It is one of the most popular local comics that was serialized in 1952. This beautiful mint green has undertones of grey and pink.”

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The color:

Sirena is an unsaturated green, almost a pale cool tone green. I can imagine a mermaid this color, so the name is appropriate.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink shows off some of the pink/grey/brown undertones.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 15 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: None

Other properties: medium-high shading, no sheen, and no shimmer. I love that the shading sometimes shifts colors in the same letter-green at the top of the letter and pinkish-brown at the bottom.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered in all nib sizes and had a little bit of bleeding.

Comparison Swabs:

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Sirena shows off a lot of the brownish-pink undertone on the Col-o-ring paper. It looks very different from Sailor Ink Studio 162 which is more of a mint green. Papier Plume Streetcar Green is darker than Sirena. (L’Artisan Pastellier Olive has changed a lot over time. It used to be a lot more green and now it’s turned to a cool-tone brown. I think I need to update my review of it.) Click here to see the green inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Pilot Vanishing Point Galaxy with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had a slightly dry flow. There is some nice shading, but because the ink is so light it’s hard to see.

Overall, I love that the color shifts between green, pink, brown and grey. It is very pale though, so I would stick to broad and flex nibs to make it readable. Even then it can still be rather pale. I enjoy pastel inks and love broader nibs, so I think I could make it work for me, but I don’t love this one as much as I thought I would.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink was provided by Vanness Pens for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does not contain affiliate links, and this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #822: Stipula Sepia

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Yesterday I reviewed Cross Blue which was sent in by a reader, so today I decided to review another reader send-in, Stipula Sepia. Sepia is from the Calmo line, sometimes also referred to as Netto (I have no idea why!). These inks come in large 70ml bottles. You can find this ink for sale at Pen Chalet.

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The color:

Sepia is a medium, warm toned brown. It doesn’t quite look sepia to me, more of a warm brown.

Swabs:

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In large swabs on Tomoe River paper the ink looks so much cooler-toned than it does in writing.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 40 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: None

Other properties: medium shading, no sheen, and no shimmer.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered and bled in all nib sizes.

Comparison Swabs:

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Sepia is similar to Robert Oster Aussie Brown. Click here to see the brown inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Kaweco Al-sport red with a medium nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, it’s a nice well-behaved ink. I don’t think the name is particularly well-fitting but that has nothing to do with its performance.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink as provided by a reader for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does contain affiliate links, but this post is not sponsored in any way.

Ink Review #821: Cross Blue

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Every once in a while a reader will send me an ink to try, which allows me to play with some new ink. Recently a reader sent me Cross Blue to play with. You can find this ink at Vanness Pens.

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The color:

Blue is a medium blue that has just a bit of a purple undertone.

Swabs:

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In large swabs the ink looks so much prettier than it does in writing. A little bit of bronzy sheen and a pretty purple shade.

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Writing samples:

Let's take a look at how the ink behaves on fountain pen friendly papers: Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Leuchtturm.

Dry time: 30 seconds

Water resistance: Low

Feathering: None

Show through: Medium

Bleeding: None

Other properties: low shading, tiny sheen, and no shimmer. The sheen was only visible in large swabs on Tomoe River paper.

On Staples 24 lb copy paper the ink feathered and bled in all nib sizes.

Comparison Swabs:

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Cross Blue is pretty similar to Thornton’s Blue and Private Reserve Cosmic Cobalt. Click here to see the blue inks together.

Longer Writing:

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I used a Pelikan M600 Turquoise with a broad nib on Tomoe River paper. The ink had an average flow.

Overall, I think it’s a nice basic blue ink. I like the color, but it is similar to some other inks I already own.

Disclaimer: A sample of this ink as provided by a reader for the purpose of this review. All photos and opinions are my own. This page does contain affiliate links, but this post is not sponsored in any way.